Artistry in Action 2017- Summary, Homework & Notes- Class #11- 5/10/17

Hello all,

We are definitely in the home stretch.  In the next couple weeks, expect to hear from me with some responses to all the homework that has been turned in so far.  Also I’m looking forward to the slate of guest artists we have visiting the class.  Here is the schedule

Monday, May 15- Composer Kenji Bunch (Sorry I mis-printed his date earlier)

Wednesday, May 24- Artist Lisa Jarrett
Wednesday, May 31- Film maker John Teton
Wednesday, June 5, media artist Dave Colangelo
A couple important notes:
1) Life Goals Notebook/Life plan back to front is listed as being due on Wednesday, May 15th. Given that there is no such date. I’m am changing the due date to Wednesday May 24th to give people a bit more time to get it done. Please either bring a hard copy to class on that date, or email it to me BEFORE that day’s class
2) Please look on the homework section of this post for the description of the Final Project assignment. I will talk about it briefly in the next class, but would advise you to start the process now, and bring any questions you have to class on Monday.

IN CLASS

  • We had a discussion regarding things that came up in the readings in Art and Fear.

 

  • We started in on the “Take A Risk” exercise.  Thanks to Tess & Brendon for sharing their work.  I mentioned that I was struck by the level of analysis and research that goes into the work that Tess does in architectural design.  I offered the idea that we in other art fields might consider how this aspect of the work might affect our processes in our own disciplines.  Also the idea that in architectural design, art is applied to solving problems, but also to changing the nature of the conversation, because by making something beautiful, you are declaring the value of individuals or groups who may not usually be seen as valuable. By asserting that they deserve art, you then have the opportunity to have a different conversation about human values. With Brendon’s film we talked about the idea that just because something is created for a niche market, does not mean it cannot have universal impact.  The values expressed by his artistic choices are in fact universals that many people who may not be knowledgeable about the subject matter may nonetheless find meaningful and inspiring.

Here is the schedule for the remaining “Take A Risk” Presentations

Mon May 15th
Leslie G
Weds May 17th
Robert B
Maeve D
Jennifer H
Dylan N
Chris T
Weds May 24
Eric M
Kelsey P
Jennifer Le
Paris B
Zoe H
Weds May 31
Lauren G
Breanne N
Hector Z
Jenna M
“Take a Risk”-Exercise –  Bring a piece of your art and share it with class  Reflect and be prepared to talk in class about the following questions about your work in relation to community:

1.Can this work provide a model for what your fellow classmates (even those who practice other disciplines or art forms) do?
2. Is there a way this work can initiate dialogue and healing?
3. What are “the Universals” in your art form.  The Universals are the core principles of your art that relate the humans beyond the work.  In jazz music, for example one universal might be called  “navigating difference.”  Another is “improvisation” This is a key part of the process of s “discovering the Universals”  The Universals provide  larger answers to the question “why do we do what we do?”  When we discover them, then we see what our art has in common with and what it has to offer to the lives of people very different from ourselves.=

 


HOMEWORK  (Be sure to refer to Master homework list for the homework that is due next class, including:

1. Community Gathering Assignment- Date for Pt 1 changed to May 15th
Pt. 1. – Research places to find community in your artistic field and start a list. Bring to class for discussion.   Now Due Wednesday, May 15
Pt. 2-  Go to a gathering or event of one of these communities. (Note- this doesn’t have to be a community of people who all look like you, or do what you do.  You can be the  only person in your discipline who is there, as long as it feels like a place that might provide community for your artistic endeavors and aspirations. Report back to the class on what happened – Due Wednesday, May 31st

2. Life Goals Notebook/Life plan back to front.

Completed Project due date changed to Wednesday, May 24th

3. Find a Mentor” Project Journal Due
Choose an artist that you feel would assist you on your artistic path and make a connection with them. You want to put yourself more in an apprenticeship role, and establish an ongoing relationship.  Keep a weekly log on the process to be assessed in Week 5 and turned in at the end of the term.  Due by email or hard copy on Wednesday, June 7
4. Final Project- Artist’s Statement: Here is a revised version of the guide to creating an artist statement.  Use this guide to direct yourself through the process.

Artistry in Action –How to write an artist statement

The assignment is using this guide to direct yourself through the process, write and turn in a draft of your own Artist Statement.  It should contain the following components as referred to in the guide:

* Introduction of Self
* Title
* General Concepts
* In-depth points
* Conclusion

Turn in by email by 5:00 PM Monday June 12th.  I will be available during the final exam period for this class on Tuesday, June 13th  between 12:30 & 2:20 to discuss the artists statements with anyone who would like in-person feedback.


BOARD PHOTOS

 

Artistry in Action 2017- Summary, Homework & Notes- Class #9 & 10- 5/1/17 & 5/3/17

Hello all,

Sorry I missed sending the mid-week class summary this week.  Thanks for all the good work and discussion that you all offered up in class this week.  I’m glad people are using the opportunity to get caught up on assignments.  My apologies for not checking in on the homework in Wednesday’s class, but since the visit with Marcus Shelby was so interesting, I decided to keep going with that. IMPORTANT- CLASS WILL NOT MEET ON MONDAY MAY 8TH.  IN LIEU OF CLASS I AM GIVING YOU A READING ASSIGNMENT- ART & FEAR CHAPTER 4 (10 PGS) & CHAPTER 6 (10 PGS). A link to the PDF is in the homework section below, as well as on the class readings page.

Please look at the homework page for other upcoming and current assignments.  (Also just a note of reminder the Life Goals Notebook/Life plan back to front completed project is due Wednesday, May 17th)

IN CLASS

  • On Monday we started off class with the obituary assignment. Thanks to Lesley, Hector & Jennifer H. for sharing theirs.  It seems a valuable exercise to imagine the best possible life for yourself.  I encouraged people to aim high, and be willing to risk thinking of themselves as significant

 

  • We had a long discussion about how the market affects setting prices for our art and our.  We talked about how to find information about what prices the market will bear in your field.  In some fields information is published- like pay scales for musicians unions. In some fields like theater you can contact the employers and ask them about how and how much compensate artists.

 

  • I gave a mini-assignment to set a price for a work of art or an artistically-related service that you might provide, based on the discussions we have had around setting prices.

 

  •   In the last few minutes of class I briefly discussed the future assignments for the next week or so I also talked about the street was professor reading. I asked people to do selling price assignment for next class. Come in with a price that you would charge for some unit of work that you were due for service you would provide.
  • On Wednesday we did some updates on the “find a mentor” exercise.  People talked about about how they are progressing or where they are stuck. I said that it is important to be honest about where you are, even if you have made what seems like no progress.  Honestly stating where you are is progress.  We talked about taking small steps if you are stuck.  Asking your self the question: “What is the next thing I can do” is an antidote to the feeling like the task is impossible.  Also telling someone of your intentions can be helpful.  This not only makes it more real for you, but you may find yourself supported in your efforts.

 

  • Wednesday – bassist, composer & bandleader Marcus Shelby was our visiting artist.  He is someone who really exemplifies the growth mindset.  One takeaway for me was the way that  he sets very clear artistic goals and is willing to pursue them over long time frames.  He also chooses his artistic goals based on what interests him, not on what he might currently be good at.  Because of this he is always learning and growing.  Marcus mentioned many other things in his inspiring talk:  the importance of mentors, persistence,  applying for grants. We’ll recap his visit in our next class meeting for those who weren’t there.

HOMEWORK  (Be sure to refer to Master homework list for the homework that is due next class, including:

1. Who is your model Exercise” : Choose 1 person in your field that you don’t know about and find out about their career. Take some notes and be prepared to discuss in class. (You can combine this with the “Survey the Field” exercise. Make this one of the 6-8 people on your list.) -Due Wednesday, May 3

2. Cash Flow Assignment

Assignment-  Figure out your cash flow.  Use one of the following online calculators to come up with your current monthly cash flow.  Do a second iteration that reflects your estimate for immediately after you graduate.  Print out a copy and be prepared to discuss in class- Due Wednesday, May 3

 

3. Find a Mentor” Project
Choose an artist that you feel would assist you on your artistic path and make a connection with them. You want to put yourself more in an apprenticeship role, and establish an ongoing relationship.  Keep a weekly log on the process to be assessed in Week 5 and turned in at the end of the term. Assessment Due- May 3

4.  Read the blog post The Streetwise Professor about diversifying your “store.”
5. Set a price that you might charge for some piece of artistic work, or  artistically-related service you would provide.  Bring to next class for discussion
6.  Community Gathering Assignment
Pt. 1. – Research places to find community in your artistic field and start a list. Bring to class for discussion.   Due Wednesday, May 10th
Pt. 2-  Go to a gathering or event of one of these communities. (Note- this doesn’t have to be a community of people who all look like you, or do what you do.  You can be the  only person in your discipline who is there, as long as it feels like a place that might provide community for your artistic endeavors and aspirations. Report back to the class on what happened – Due Wednesday, May 31st

BOARD PHOTOS

Legos & You.Inc. from “Lessons from a Streetwise Professor”

These are paraphrases of two articles from a great book on Music Entrepreneurship from one of my former professors  Ramon Ricker.  They are equally applicable to entrepreneurship in any artistic field. To help communicate this I have changed out all the words music or musical for “art” or “artistic”

Legos.

You know what they are, little interlocking pieces of plastic that can be combined in an infinite number of ways.  With Legos you can make things like buildings or vehicles.  If you don’t like what you make, you can continually try to improve it by rearranging the pieces; or you can take your creation apart and construct something else.  In [art] and in life, the knowledge and skills, both [artistic] and [non-artistic], which you have acquired thus far are like Legos.  You put them together to create and build a career.  You build “you.”

Of course there are many [artists] whose Lego kit is almost a duplicate of yours.  Your job is to find some pieces that are unique and special.  And just as your first attempt at constructing something with Legos may be insipid. oddly shaped and not very creative, your first attempt with your music career may be similar.  You may find that you are missing some blocks, but through self-study or with a mentor or a teacher you will be able to find what you need.

The point is that if you have [artistic]  talent, and if you have worked hard to develop it, you have the building blocks necessary to create a career.  The first step is to be [artistically] and technically solid [at your craft].  Add to that some entrepreneurial savvy and you’re on you’re your way.

You, Inc.

Professional are, in effect , a small business, offering goods and services just as any small business would.  Imaging a newly minted clarinetist from a top music school.  She may be a fine player, but what does that clarinetist really offer the marketplace?  Who will pay for what she can do?  Importantly, for the clarinetist, will it provide enough money on which to live?

Our clarinetist’s product is playing music on the clarinet, but what style of music––orchestra, chamber, klezmer, Dixieland, jazz?  If the only product she can offer is soprano clarinet (B-flat and A) and she only plays the classical and orchestral repertoire, she better be the best in the world, or at least on the way to becoming the best in the world. This type of musician is equivalent to a boutique store––offering very high quality goods but with limited selections and sharply focused on one thing.  Over time, to remain relevant, our clarinetist must expand by continually adding to her repertoire––putting more clarinet product on the shelves.  This keeps her challenged and familiar with recently composed music.  And just as a Chevrolet comes out with a new model of the same vehicle each year, our clarinetist needs to keep her core product in top shape and continually improving as she revisits previously performed pieces, making them better and better. If she wants to diversify and offer more products, she might add the smaller E-flat clarinet or the larger bass clarinet.  This creates more possible income channels for her. But as she adds these product lines the quality must be kept at an undisputedly high level.  She has to really command these instruments and not just dabble in them.

Let’s say our clarinetist has added these other instruments to her product line and things are going well.  She’s getting some work playing chamber music and is getting some calls to sub in the local orchestra.  How does she expand her store?  That depends on her background and interests.  Maybe she plays in a woodwind trio or quintet.  If she has the talent for and interest in composing and arranging she could write for her ensemble. If the music is well received, there may be a publishing avenue for her to follow.  If she is handy and dexterous she may do some minor instrument repair work.  But whatever additional products she pursues to make herself more attractive to the buying public, it is crucial for her to maintain the high quality of project that she is becoming known for.

So you see, building a career as a professional is like stocking a store with products.  None of us wants a dingy, musty store that just sells beer and cigarettes.  We want our store to sparkle, to exude quality and to be a place where the customer can get the finest there is.  As our clarinetist stocks her store, she begins to establish a reputation.  Marketing peopled say she is creating a brand.

Artistry in Action 2017- Summary, Homework & Notes- Class #8- 4/26/17

Hello all,

Here is the summary of the class yesterday.  Lots of very interesting discussions.  A couple of notes. I understand that the first link in the cashflow assignment is not working for some people.  If this is true, you may want to use the 2nd link instead.  Note that a couple of the longer-term homework assignments have some components due next week.  Specifically the “Write your onw Obituary exercise which is due by email tomorrow. and an assessment of your progress in the “Find a Mentor” exercise.

IN CLASS

  • I started the class off reminding folks to let me know in advance when they’re not going to come. I talked about the reasons for this. 1) because doing so is contradiction to the resistance  that would have you blow things off and just not show up. 2) because doing so is a contradiction for me as an instructor.  As I try to occupy a growth mindset in teaching this class it is helpful to have the clarity about why people might be missing, as a contradiction to the fixed mindset stories I might be pulled to create about it.

 

  • We had a very good discussion about the economic chain homework. Jenna, Chris & Eric shared some illustrations from their fields.  (See Board Photo) We looked for ways in these different fields that they could contribute both upstream of the position they started as well as downstream.  I talked about how the place you start the chain is simply a vantage point.  You don’t need to be held to it. Nor do you need to have the official title to operate from that point in the chain. For instance, one not need be bestowed the title of Art Director in order to do the work of an art director.  The other thing to remember is to look at the underlying skillset rather than the job title.  An author is really a purveyor of ideas.  She may write them in books or blogs. She may pair with an illustrator and put them into graphic novels or illustrated books.  She may write them down and deliver them as lectures.  Don’t get hung up on the job title.  Finally, it is important to remember where the inputs ultimately come from- audience, readers, viewers, and look for different routes to connect with the ultimate users.  Sometimes this is through partnerships- I gave the illustration of my partnerships with non-profits to increase my musical audience of folks who shared the same values.  Sometimes this is through alternative forms of distribution that avoid the traditional middlemen.

 

  • We broke into small groups and looked at some fields on the Bureau of Labor statistics and the  O-Net online.  I talked about the importance of getting real data on employment in different fields.   I talked about looking at places outside of the top markets for different fields.  Often there are opportunities in surprising places that may be more conducive to the activities you want to pursue or the places you might prefer to live.

 

  • We spent the last part of the class exploring the economics around the profession of tattoo artists.  I talked about how we might be able to adapt or adopt some of those aspects into our own fields.  One interesting one the exclusivity that functions in tattooing, which turns it into a specialty good as opposed to a commodity.  Since the amount of work one can purchase is limited by the actual square inches of body space, people are very selective.  Also tattoos are deeply linked to self image, so people are willing to spend extraordinary amounts to get exactly what they want because it’s deeply tied to their own sense of self-expression. Is there way that other art forms can create similar perception?  Are there ways that other  art forms can achieve this idea of exclusivity or limited availability. Zoe told us that tattoo artists tour around the country much like DJs or musicians.  They’ll “open their appointment books” for a certain amount of time for bookings and then travel around to do the work. Another interesting aspect of the economics of tattooing is that tattoo artists are also paid an hourly for time. This is different from the usual artistic model which is paid by the project.  One thing I was curious about is that tattooing as a business is not collaborative.  Most companies divide labor into specialties to create more efficiencies.  But tattooing is less about perfection than personality. Someone who trained assistants in their style could make much more money, by focusing their time on what they were best at, or on finishing the end product.

HOMEWORK  (Be sure to refer to Master homework list for the homework that is due next class, including:

  1. Write your own obituary exercise

Download and read the PDF below for this assignment. Due by email, Friday, April 29th, Also bring a draft to class Monday, May 1

WRITE YOUR OWN OBITUARY EXERCISE

2. Who is your model Exercise” : Choose 1 person in your field that you don’t know about and find out about their career. Take some notes and be prepared to discuss in class. (You can combine this with the “Survey the Field” exercise. Make this one of the 6-8 people on your list.)-Due Wednesday, May 3

3. Research Your Field Assignments

On O-Net Online go to this link to the Arts, Audio/Video Technology & Communications on O-Net

http://www.onetonline.org/find/career?c=3&g=Go

or this link to Arts, Design, Entertainment, Sports, and Media Occupations on BLS

https://www.bls.gov/oes/current/oes_stru.htm#27-0000

Assignment: Choose one of the job fields at these links and 

A. Look for a cash-flow work area.  It can be your art form, a related field, or something different. Look at BLS for a list of work area.  Look at O-Net for a summary of skills, knowledge, education, training & other info related to the specific job.
B. Look for cities that might be good for what you want to do  Look not just at your field, but look for cities that have related communities in common & networks that might be useful.  Check out prospects in two US cities that you think you might be interested in living in.
C. Research what do jobs pay in different area of the country. Find out what the going rate is for 3 jobs in your industry.
All 3 of these assignments are Due Monday, May 1

4. Cash Flow Assignment

Assignment-  Figure out your cash flow.  Use one of the following online calculators to come up with your current monthly cash flow.  Do a second iteration that reflects your estimate for immediately after you graduate.  Print out a copy and be prepared to discuss in class- Due Wednesday, May 3

 

5. Find a Mentor” Project
Choose an artist that you feel would assist you on your artistic path and make a connection with them. You want to put yourself more in an apprenticeship role, and establish an ongoing relationship.  Keep a weekly log on the process to be assessed in Week 5 and turned in at the end of the term.
Assessment Due- May 3

BOARD PHOTOS

 

Artistry in Action 2017- Summary, Homework & Notes- Class #7- 4/24/17

Hello all,

Great class yesterday.  For those of you who missed class, please be sure to email me before class begins that you will not make it.   Here is the summary of the class

IN CLASS

  • We started the class off with a musical sharing that Hector brought. (Check the link at the bottom of the page) I talked about the need to develop a good mindset to embody as people listen to or view your work. I talked about the connection of this to the attitude you carry duirng your elevator speech. It is challenging to remain neutral or even be positive as you share your work with people.  We all are pulled into the habit of making apologies, or trying to explain or otherwise deflect possible criticism.  We need to break that habit. Several of you in the class shared similar experiences and observations about this.  I also shared the Marianne Williamson quote.

“Our deepest fear is not that we are inadequate. Our deepest fear is that we are powerful beyond measure. It is our light, not our darkness that most frightens us. We ask ourselves, ‘Who am I to be brilliant, gorgeous, talented, fabulous?’ Actually, who are you not to be? You are a child of God. Your playing small does not serve the world. There is nothing enlightened about shrinking so that other people won’t feel insecure around you. We are all meant to shine, as children do. We were born to make manifest the glory of God that is within us. It’s not just in some of us; it’s in everyone. And as we let our own light shine, we unconsciously give other people  ― Marianne Williamson, A Return to Love: Reflections on the Principles of “A Course in Miracles”

  • Jen also shared the book and podcast by Elizabeth Gilbert called “Big Magic” that relates to these ideas.  Here’s the link to her website with both the book and the podcast

https://www.elizabethgilbert.com/magic-lessons/

  • Then we watched the NPR video with George Clinton and rapper Big Mike, and talked about its connections to the things we talked about in this class: separating your art and your cashflow,  building community, and making audacious choices in support of your art. The other thing I took from hearing from both them is how hard they worked, how committed they were both of them to succeeding on their path. I think that is a common element in the stories of those who have found success with their work-whether it is visible from the surface or not.
  • I shared the idea of looking at your interactions with others in a flexible way. I talked about my tendency to define people by the professional role they play in my interactions with them. I tend to forget that is far more to the Fred Meyer cashier or a Tri-met driver or a physical therapist or lawyer than the professional role they happen to be occupying at the time. Remembering this opens the possibility for a range of connections or relationships as well as opportunities to connect around art.

 

  • We broke into groups and we talked about the Survey the Field exercise. I asked people to discuss the following questions.
How did this assignment go for you?
What was the process like in looking for people?
Did it help clarify more about what you want to do?
Did it help you see the field more clearly?
Some takeaways were that 1) You could go very deep with this process. There are a lot of people in the field.  My advice is that from a business standpoint the better sense you have of the whole field the more easily you can find places for yourself in it, and the better your understanding of how it functions. 2) People were sometimes hard to find online.  I posed the question of whether this might present a need or an opportunity, either to create a platform that makes it easier to discover people, or to figure out ways to make sure that your work is not lost in the shuffle.  This is the goal of SEO (search engine optimization) in raising companies (or individuals) online profile.
  • I introduced the “Who is your model Exercise” (see homework section below) : Choose 1 person in your field that you don’t know about and find out about their career. Be prepared to discuss in class. (You can combine this with the “Survey the Field” exercise. Make this one of the 6-8 people on your list.)
  • I talked about two useful ways to follow through on this project.  1. For each of the people who made your list, and whose path represents something you aspire to,  figure out what it is about their career/work that you would like to see reflected in your own.  Maybe it’s their balance of activities, maybe it is a personal characteristic, maybe an approach to doing their work, or engaging with their audience.  2.  Figure out a way to connect with them.  If you think of this list of being the beginning of your (national/international) community, then how do you make a connection.  One important question is: “What do I want from them?”  Another important question to answer in your own mind is “Why would they want to engage with me?”  If you can answer these questions then you are ready to approach them.
  •  After the break we looked at the “Economy of a Wedding Gig illustration (You can find it in the top menu on the blog homepage)  I talked about the need to understand the entire cost structure of an endeavor in order to figure out what percentage of the cost you should be paid. I asked people to start to make a list of what your costs are both the direct costs- expenses you incur in creating the art, and the indirect costs-ongoing expenses related to doing your art that you can pro-rate for each project or service. For example: the chiropractic appointments that bass player might need in order to offset the effects of carrying a heavy electric bass all the time.  In the next class we will look at these costs, as well as looking at the market for your work and how that affects how much you charge. Market research is something every business has to do to determine what price the market will bear for their good or service.  This information can come from trade documents-such as union price lists,  etc.  Some of it you will need ask people in your field about.  It’s important to remember that though you may not get “your price” for a long period of time, you are empowered by knowing what it is.  You can then determine whether or not to discount it, or whether you want to take your payment in “currency” other than money, such as exposure, or mission satisfaction, or barter. But this decision is really up to you as the artist. Until you have adequate information it’s hard to feel good about those decisions, or to have a clear sense of your worth.

HOMEWORK  (Be sure to refer to Master homework list for the homework that is due next class, including:

1. NEW-Who is your model Exercise” : Choose 1 person in your field that you don’t know about and find out about their career. Take some notes and be prepared to discuss in class. (You can combine this with the “Survey the Field” exercise. Make this one of the 6-8 people on your list.)-Due Wednesday, May 3

2. “Economic Chain” Homework – due date changed to Wednesday- April 26

Assignment: Make a diagram of the economic chain of your industry. What and who are the places where money flows from & to.  Remember there are many different revenue streams in every industry. For the purposes of this assignment, focus on a few. The goal is to begin to understand the flow of money in different areas around your art.  The more places in the chain that you can participate, the greater the possibilities for you to increase that revenue.

Bring the diagram  to class for discussion on Wednesday, April 26th

3. Research Your Field Assignments

On O-Net Online go to this link to the Arts, Audio/Video Technology & Communications on O-Net

http://www.onetonline.org/find/career?c=3&g=Go

or this link to Arts, Design, Entertainment, Sports, and Media Occupations on BLS

https://www.bls.gov/oes/current/oes_stru.htm#27-0000

Assignment: Choose one of the job fields at these links and 

A. Look for a cash-flow work area.  It can be your art form, a related field, or something different. Look at BLS for a list of work area.  Look at O-Net for a summary of skills, knowledge, education, training & other info related to the specific job.
B. Look for cities that might be good for what you want to do  Look not just at your field, but look for cities that have related communities in common & networks that might be useful.  Check out prospects in two US cities that you think you might be interested in living in.
C. Research what do jobs pay in different area of the country. Find out what the going rate is for 3 jobs in your industry.
All 3 of these assignments are Due Monday, May 1

5. Cash Flow Assignment

Assignment-  Figure out your cash flow.  Use one of the following online calculators to come up with your current monthly cash flow.  Do a second iteration that reflects your estimate for immediately after you graduate.  Print out a copy and be prepared to discuss in class- Due Wednesday, May 3

 

BOARD PHOTOS

 

Artistry in Action 2017- Summary, Homework & Notes- Class #6- 4/19/17

Hello all,

Thanks for an excellent class on Wednesday.  We are still looking at issues of how to research your field and  how to enter the profession, as well as our potential role as artists. This are all tricky subjects as the are central some of our goals and dreams with our art.  As you do the homework this week pay particular attention to fixed mindset thoughts and try to expand your growth mindset. Small steps are important.

IN CLASS

  • We started off with elevator speeches.  Thanks to Lesley, Hector, Jen & Eric for sharing theirs, and to the group for some astute observations.  Some of the takeaways

-Use I statements- talk about yourself not the art.

-Find a universal connections.

-Say what you do

-Don’t be afraid to be bold or provocative

-The elevator speech should naturally lead into more questions

  • We spent a lot of time looking at the idea of Economic Chains. We looked at a particular industry (photography) and chose one of the places money flows.  We thought of some “upstream” links- places where money flows in to photographers (who pay’s them), and some of the intermediaries. Then we looked at some of the “downstream” points- those people that photographers pay.  (See Board Photo)  We talked about how it is often easier to see places to participate downstream, ie; if photographers need to rent photo studios then you can figure out a way to be the person who provides them space.  The bigger challenge is to understand and figure out the chain upstream.  That is where the a higher percentage of the money is.  I also mentioned people like union organizers whose role is to advocate for the photographers, or for the industry. They participate all throughout the chain.

 

  •       I presented my idea of the 3-legged stool which is the idea that to sustain themselves as artists you will need 3 things:

A) An ecosystem around your Art–I put out the proposition that the art leg — the tools, environment, resources to do your art — be something that you commit to doing without the expectation that you will earn money from it.

B) To sustain their artistic practice over a lifetime artists need a means to meet cash flow. You can call this a “day job” if you want, but it doesn’t have to take place during the day.   Artists need a connection to a node of activities toward which our society has decided to direct resources. These include feeding people, healing people, educating people, governing people, entertaining people, selling goods to people.  This cash flow activity  may or may not use the same skills you use in making your art.  It may or may not involve doing many of the same actual activities you do in making your art.  It may be related to your art, a spinoff from your art, or the polar opposite of your art, but I propose you not think of it as your art.

C) Some type of investment/passive income. This can come from investing (both financial investing and investments in relationships (including marriage & family) , or investments in education) entrepreneurship, intellectual & real property, or building community and support networks.

  • I talked some more about Bureau of Labor Statistics & O-Net  (These are resources for the 2nd leg of the stool) We looked at“Data Resources on Arts Employment” page on blogBureau of Labor Statistics is the official govt. source of data on occupations and jobs. in the US. This is the place to go to research employment, salary and other info on almost any field you can imagine.  Want to know how many sculptors are working in Vermont vs. Iowa. This is the place you can find out.  Want to find out the avg annual salary for Art Directors in L.A. vs. Atlanta.  You can get all that here.

This link is the main page for Occupational Employment Statistics that has national research on any jobs Include the best cities & states to find them, employment trends (is this a growing or shrinking field?) average salary, and lots of other info. From here you are a couple clicks from whatever you want to find out.

http://www.bls.gov/oes/current/oes_stru.htm 

This links are to the Occupational Outlook Handbook page that is specific to Arts-related fields.  Clicking here will get you descriptions of jobs in the arts & design fields (1st link) and the entertainment field (actors, dancers, musicians, directors, etc), what the work entails, skills and education required, how to get into the field, From here you can drill down to specific info about the field. ThiThi

http://www.bls.gov/ooh/arts-and-design/home.htm

https://www.bls.gov/ooh/entertainment-and-sports/home.htm

O-Net Online is a resource for specific annual occupation data on every field in which statistics are kept. This link is to the O-NET Online Cluster listing for Arts, Audio-visiual & Communications-

http://www.onetonline.org/find/career?c=3&g=Go


HOMEWORK  (Be sure to refer to Master homework list for the homework that is due next class, including:

There was no new homework today,  but lots of things are due in the next week or so. Please contact me if any of this is not clear

  1. I updated the link below to the  two blog posts I asked you to comment on.  Let me know if it works Write a comment to one of them in the comments section

https://artistryinaction.wordpress.com/2017/04/12/artistry-in-action-2016-weekly-readings-week-2-art-isnt-only/

2. Survey the Field Assignment-

Assignment: Look up 6-8 individuals who do what you aspire to do.  Start a list that includes their names, brief description of their work and the professional affiliations.  Be as specific as you can to your particular goals- for ex: not just any 6 jazz piano players, but piano players who play jazz & other styles, who also receive grants for composition, who live in New York Area.
Submit assignment by email by Friday, April 21st,  Bring print out to class for discussion on Monday, April 24th

3. “Economic Chain” Homework

Assignment: Make a diagram of the economic chain of your industry. What and who are the places where money flows from & to.  Remember there are many different revenue streams in every industry. For the purposes of this assignment, focus on a few. The goal is to begin to understand the flow of money in different areas around your art.  The more places in the chain that you can participate, the greater the possibilities for you to increase that revenue.

Bring the diagram  to class for discussion on Monday, April 24th

4. Research Your Field Assignments

On O-Net Online go to this link to the Arts, Audio/Video Technology & Communications on O-Net

http://www.onetonline.org/find/career?c=3&g=Go

or this link to Arts, Design, Entertainment, Sports, and Media Occupations on BLS

https://www.bls.gov/oes/current/oes_stru.htm#27-0000

Assignment: Choose one of the job fields at these links and 

A. Look for a cash-flow work area.  It can be your art form, a related field, or something different. Look at BLS for a list of work area.  Look at O-Net for a summary of skills, knowledge, education, training & other info related to the specific job.
B. Look for cities that might be good for what you want to do  Look not just at your field, but look for cities that have related communities in common & networks that might be useful.  Check out prospects in two US cities that you think you might be interested in living in.
C. Research what do jobs pay in different area of the country. Find out what the going rate is for 3 jobs in your industry.
All 3 of these assignments are Due Monday, May 1

5. Cash Flow Assignment

Assignment-  Figure out your cash flow.  Use one of the following online calculators to come up with your current monthly cash flow.  Do a second iteration that reflects your estimate for immediately after you graduate.  Print out a copy and be prepared to discuss in class- Due Wednesday, May 3

 

 

BOARD PHOTOS

Artistry in Action 2017- Summary, Homework & Notes- Class #5- 4/17/17

Hello all,

Thanks for a good class yesterday.  I was interested to hear everyone’s input.

IN CLASS

  • Lesley brought in a fascinating blog post regarding the Fearless Girl, and we talked about the what happens to works of art once they enter into circulation.  The article presents a lot of great history and arguments for both sides of the controversy.  Great food for thought regarding the ideas in the “Economies of Life” article, and the “commodifying” of art.

https://gregfallis.com/2017/04/14/seriously-the-guy-has-a-point/

  • We had a discussion about the Mindsets assignments, and some people shared the fixed mindset thoughts they worked on this week.  We talked about how you come up with Growth mindset thoughts and then actions around those growth mindset thoughts. (See Board Photo)
  • We broke into small groups for a short discussion about the roles of different art forms in society, and shared those reflections with the class.  We talked about general roles for the arts, and I made some suggestions for more specific roles. (See Board photos) I read some quotes from Andrew Simonet (pages 34-35) as well as the 2 readings about Art’s role that I put in on the homework page

    ArchitectureSpeechFPARetreat

    Karl Paulnack Welcome Address

    We will continue the discussion in Wednesday’s class and talk about the question3. Can I create work that initiates dialogue and healing?

  • I talked about financial models and the difference between the financial models of an Art Gallery as opposed to a music venue.  I suggested that you think about switching up on the traditional model for your art form- ie- selling visual art in bars, or curating live musical performances.
  • I introduced the Economic Chain homework assignment.  (See Homework below)  This is the idea of discovering the places that money flows from and to in your industry.  I talked about musician Patrick Lamb who realized that there was an opportunity in the ticketing side of the music business for small venues & non-profit presenters, so he started the successful ticketing company Ticket Tomato  I talked about the parasol artist who’s art work decorates the Drift Inn restaurant in Yachats, Oregon. (They are also there for sale) The more places in the economic chain you are aware of, the more opportunities there are for you to engage and earn income.
  • I briefly talked about the upcoming homework with O-Net job descriptions for art fields & Data Resources on Art employment
  • I talked about the cash flow assignment (See Homework below)

 

HOMEWORK  (Be sure to refer to Master homework list for the homework that is due next class, including:

  • Prepare your Elevator Speech- We will present on Wednesday

  • Read these two blog posts at the link below.(if you haven’t already)
    Write a comment to one of them in the comments section

https://wordpress.com/post/artistryinaction.wordpress.com/3377

  • Define Your Work Environment” Assignment
  • Survey the Field Assignment-Submit assignment by email by Friday, April 21 Bring print out to class for discussion on Monday, April 24th

NEW HOMEWORK

1. “Economic Chain” Homework

Assignment: Make a diagram of the economic chain of your industry. What and who are the places where money flows from & to.  Remember there are many different revenue streams in every industry. For the purposes of this assignment, focus on a few. The goal is to begin to understand the flow of money in different areas around your art.  The more places in the chain that you can participate, the greater the possibilities for you to increase that revenue.

Bring the diagram  to class for discussion on Monday, April 24th

2. Assignment-  Figure out your cash flow.  Use one of the following online calculators to come up with your current monthly cash flow.  Do a second iteration that reflects your estimate for immediately after you graduate.  Print out a copy and be prepared to discuss in class- Due Wednesday, May 3

3. Look at this O-Net master list of Employment Fields

http://www.onetonline.org/find/career?c=3&g=Go

Assignment: Use O-Net to:

  1. Check out prospects in two US cities that you think you might be interested in living in.- Due Wednesday, April 26

2. get employment information on your field and 2 related fields.   Due Wednesday, April 26

BOARD PHOTOS

A in A Board Photo #2 (4_17_17)A in A Board Photo #1 (4_17_17)

 

Artistry in Action 2017- Summary, Homework & Notes- Class #4- 4/12/17

Hello all,

I enjoyed the class discussion yesterday.  I’m always pleased to hear from many different voices, and almost everybody spoke up in class today.   Once again I didn’t get  through some of the things I had hoped to cover.  But I’m very pleased with the discussions we had and I’ve tried to expand the notes on this blog post to introduce some of the next things we will talka bout.

IN CLASS

  • Maeve turned us on to this interesting video on the sound of tree rings (if they were played by a piano)

  • Hector asked the question “What is curating?”  which led to an interesting discussion about hwo artists make things happen.  See the board photo below for my notes on what we came up with.  I mentioned that a lot of curating is done by artists who are looking for opportunities that may not currently exist for themselves and their friends to present their work.  Curating is an important component of the artistic process.  SOMEBODY has to do it.  It could be you.

 

  • Leslie informed the class about some internship opportunities from RACC.  I’ll include the link in a blog post when I get it from her.

 

  • We talked about the mentorship assignment and made a list on the board of things you might look for in a mentor, challenges to engaging a mentor, and some solutions to those challenges. (See board photo below)

 

  • I went through the hand out on the difference between specialty goods and commodities. I think that was a very important discussion for people and something we as artists who want to make a business out of our art need to consider.

music-commodity-chart

  • We read an excerpt from The War of Art called “What I Do” and had a pairs discussion about “what your day looks like as an artist.” I did some talking about the stages of the process of artistic creation, and the importance of noticing where the resistance can kick in at each stage.  For me the four stages are:

– Generating- this is the time that I focus on generating the work. It is important not to be critical at this stage.  This stage will be the focus of your artistic practice once you leave school.

-Organizing- for me this stage is about seeing what I have, pulling the threads together and consolidating the work I’ve generated to move toward making a completed piece of work.

-Editing- this stage is a relief for me because it involves taking things out and moving them around.  I can see the work start to take shape. This stage can go on forever unless I give myself a deadline.

-Polishing -This is the often neglected stage about working on the small details that bring the work to it’s best point.  Lot’s of resistance here because the fear of disappointment comes up.  Also the euphoria of creation has worn off and I no longer feel I’ve made some world-changing piece of work.  I have to work hard at this stage to remember that the work deserves my best effort.  This is the place where most work gets scrapped, unfortunately because of the fear of other people’s judgement.

Here is a funny illustration that perfectly describes this arc for me.

The Life of A Project- from “Steal Like An Artist” by Austin Kleon

HOMEWORK  (Be sure to refer to Master homework list for the homework that is due next class, including:

Mindset followup assignments

Evaluating your Skills Assignment

Prepare your Elevator Speech

NEW HOMEWORK

1. Read these two blog posts at the link below.(if you haven’t already)

https://wordpress.com/post/artistryinaction.wordpress.com/3377

 
2. “Define Your Work Environment” Assignment
Assignment:  Take an hour to reflect on your work environment for your art as related to “The War of Art”  Say you were going to sit down as Pressfield describes in “War of Art” and do your work, do you have what you need? What is that space? What is in it? What kind of light? What talismans for success?  Make a list of what works and what you would like to change and read it to us.

3. Another question that I’d like you to reflect on this week is Can I create work that initiates dialogue and healing?   I’ve attached two PDF’s that speak to this question.  Neither is very long. Read them in preparation for class on Monday, April 17

The first is a speech from PSU Architecture Professor Clive Knight about the mission of Architecture as he sees it.

ArchitectureSpeechFPARetreat

The second is an address from pianist and Director of the Boston Conservatory of Music Karl Paulnack about the power of Music

Karl Paulnack Welcome Address

BOARD PHOTOS

Artistry in Action 2017: Weekly Readings “Art isn’t only…” & “Maybe You Can’t Get Paid for Doing Your Art”-updated

One of the issues that we will reflect on in class this coming week is the role of art in our society. What function do we serve?  How are we seen? How do we contribute?  The following quote is another from Seth Godin’s book Linchpin that argues for a broader definition. Do we benefit from encouraging others to see themselves as artists? Or do we dilute the possibilities for ourselves and our work?  This question is also discussed in the Economies of Life Essay

The second reading is one that you may have already seen in the Week One blog readings.  It is also from Linchpin.

-Darrell

Art isn’t only a painting. Art is anything that’s creative, passionate, and personal. And great art resonates with the viewer, not only with the creator.

What makes someone an artist? I don’t think is has anything to do with a paintbrush. There are painters who follow the numbers, or paint billboards, or work in a small village in China, painting reproductions. These folks, while swell people, aren’t artists. On the other hand, Charlie Chaplin was an artist, beyond a doubt. So is Jonathan Ive, who designed the iPod. You can be an artist who works with oil paints or marble, sure. But there are artists who work with numbers, business models, and customer conversations. Art is about intent and communication, not substances.

An artist is someone who uses bravery, insight, creativity, and boldness to challenge the status quo. And an artist takes it personally.

That’s why Bob Dylan is an artist, but an anonymous corporate hack who dreams up Pop 40 hits on the other side of the glass is merely a marketer. That’s why Tony Hsieh, founder of Zappos, is an artist, while a boiler room of telemarketers is simply a scam.

Tom Peters, corporate gadfly and writer, is an artist, even though his readers are businesspeople. He’s an artist because he takes a stand, he takes the work personally, and he doesn’t care if someone disagrees. His art is part of him, and he feels compelled to share it with you because it’s important, not because he expects you to pay him for it.

Art is a personal gift that changes the recipient. The medium doesn’t matter. The intent does.

Art is a personal act of courage, something one human does that creates change in another.”

― Seth Godin, Linchpin: Are You Indispensable?

Maybe You Can’t Get Paid for Doing Your Art

The thing is, it’s far easier than ever before to surface your ideas. Far easier to have
 someone notice your interpersonal skills or your writing or your vision. Which means 
that people who might have hidden their talents are now finding them noticed.

That blog you’ve built, the one with a lot of traffic–perhaps it can’t be monetized.

That nonprofit you work with, the one where you are able to change lives–perhaps turning it into a career will ruin it.

That passion you have for abstract painting–perhaps making your work commercial enough to sell will squeeze the joy out of it.

When what you do is what you love, you’re able to invest more effort and care and time. That means you’re more likely to win, to gain share, to profit. On the other hand, poets don’t get paid. Even worse, poets who try to get paid end up writing jingles and failing and hating it at the same time.

Today, there are more ways than ever to share your talents and hobbies in public. And if you’re driven, talented, and focused, you may discover that the market loves what you do. That people read your blog or click on your cartoons or listen to your MP3s. But, alas, that doesn’t mean you can monetize it, quit your day job, and spend all day writing songs.

The pitfalls:

1. In order to monetize your work, you’ll probably corrupt it, taking out the magic, in
 search of dollars; and

2. Attention doesn’t always equal significant cash flow.

I think it makes sense to make your art your art, to give yourself over to it without regard for commerce.

Doing what you love is as important as ever, but if you’re going to make a living at it, it helps to find a niche where money flows as a regular consequence of the success of your idea. Loving what you do is almost as important as doing what you love, especially if you need to make a living at it. Go find a job you can commit to, a career or a business you can fall in love with.

A friend who loved music, who wanted to spend his life doing it, got a job doing PR for a
record label. He hated doing PR, and eventually realized that simply being in the record 
business didn’t mean he had anything at all to do with music. Instead of finding a job he 
could love, he ended up being in proximity to, but nowhere involved with, something he 
cared about. I wish he had become a committed schoolteacher instead, spending every
 minute of his spare time making music and sharing it online for free. Instead, he’s a 
frazzled publicity hound, working twice as many hours for less money and doing no 
music at all.

Maybe you can’t make money doing what you love (at least what you love right now).
But I bet you can figure out how to love what you do to make money (if you choose
 wisely).

Do your art. But don’t wreck your art if it doesn’t lend itself to paying the bills. That would be a tragedy.

(And the twist, because there is always a twist, is that as soon as you focus on your art 
and leave the money behind, you may discover that this focus turns out to be the secret of
 actually breaking through and making money.)

From Linchpin by Seth Godin

Artistry in Action 2017- Summary, Homework & Notes- Class #3 4/10/17

Hello all,

Thanks for a very interesting class today.  Here are the class notes, starting with what we covered and followed by the homework assigned today.

IN CLASS

We started the class with an amazing video referred by Robert.

Then each person paired up with a partner to talk about setting a personal artistic goal to accomplish in the next 10 weeks.  Everyone wrote these down.  The assignment is to check in with each other about the goals 1x per week.  It can be  before or after class. I noted that the things to remember when setting goals are: figuring out the next steps to accoplishing them, determining how you will know if you succeeded.  And how you will measure your progress?

We had a brief discussion about networking.  I made the the proposal that it might be better to think about the process as “starting conversations.”  There are many ways this can happen.  You can pose a question to a group (such as on Facebook) and see what responses come back.  Or you can go to a place where conversations will be happening and take part.

We talked about Mindset. I talked about the many ways a fixed mindset can hide out.  We talked about the 4 steps to incorporating a growth mindset and the homework in this area.

I handed out the PDF Evaluating Your Skills. 

I asked students to continue working on the assignment where you list the skills used in your art.  Expand these by dividing them into the following 4 areas:

  • What are your Primary Artistic Skills?

  • What are your Secondary Artistic skills?

  • What are  your Non-artistic skills- artistic, physical, cognitive, specialized and business-oriented?

  • What Unique skills do you have?

Here also is a link to the excerpt I referred to today from the “Making Your Life As An Artist” book that we are reading about leading with your mission.

https://artistryinaction.wordpress.com/2015/04/06/artistry-in-action-quote-of-the-day-3-our-role-in-the-culture/


HOMEWORK  (Refer to Master homework list for all homework assignments).  Here are the things we talked about today.

1. Mindset followup assignments:

A: This week identify 1 fixed mindset thought. Apply the 4-step exercise for changing fixed mindset thoughts that we looked at in Astrid Baumgardner’s post. Be prepared to discuss in class.– Due Monday, April 17

B: As a followup to last week’s assignment to make a list of tasks/skills required in your art and rate your current level of those skills 1-10.  Take one of the areas where your level is below what you would like.  Do some journaling about how you might apply the growth mindset to improve your level of this skill. Be prepared to discuss in class – Due Monday, April 17

3. Evaluating your Skills Assignment

Read the “The Savvy Musician” handout about the entrepreneurial mindset that I passed out in class.

Evaluating Your Skills

Expand the list of skills you have have already begun into the following 4 areas:

  • What are your Primary Artistic Skills?
  • What are your Secondary Artistic skills?
  • What are  your Non-artistic skills- artistic, physical, cognitive, specialized and business-oriented?
  • What Unique skills do you have?

4. Prepare your Elevator Speech– Describe what is important about your art in 60 seconds or less.  Lead with your mission. Write it down. We’ll practice delivering it on Monday – Due Monday April 17

Can you state in simple terms  the core principles of your art?  What is it about? What do you do? Can you touch on “the Universals”  These are the larger answers to the question “why do we do what we do? The universals help us and others to see what our art has in common and what it has to offer to the lives of people very different from ourselves.  Can you make this part of your elevator speech?

5. “Survey the Field” Exercise – Look up 6-8 individuals who do what you aspire to do.  Start a list that includes their names, brief description of their work and the professional affiliations.  Be as specific as you can to your particular goals and/or your mission.  Just because someone practiced the same art form you do doesn’t mean they embody the goals you aspire to reach.

Submit assignment by email by Friday, April 21th,  Bring print out to class for discussion- Due Monday, April 24

BOARD PHOTOS